When is the time right?

Decisions

Informing family

Will there be pain?

Saying goodbye

Understanding may be difficult

Coping

Another pet, is it time?

Keeping the memory


When is the time right

We love our pets and want what is best for their health and happiness, yet caring for your pet is a task that requires great responsibility and may leave you faced with very difficult decisions.

One such decision you may be faced with is euthanasia. No decision regarding the health and welfare of your pet will be quite as difficult or as important as this one.

A sudden accident or debilitating illness can leave a pet critically injured or so ill that they will never recover or regain the health and vitality required for a good quality of life. You may well lose the ability to enjoy many of the activities with your or your family that he or she previously could and may lose the ability to respond to you.

If injury or illness permanently reduces your loved pet to the stage where there is more pain than pleasure in their life, your family veterinarian may be consulted for their peaceful and humane euthanasia.

The decision of whether to euthanize a terminally ill pet is a very personal one and is ultimately yours to make however you should seek support from your veterinarian, family and friends to ensure your decision is the right one.

Take time to consider the welfare of your pet and the family who love their pet. The important factor is the quality of life.

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Decisions

Your decision is a very serious one and will not be easy when considering the close emotional bond you have with your pet.

You are best to begin by ensuring you fully understand all the facts regarding your pets situation and comprehend the future implications of these. Your veterinarian will understand your close emotional attachment to your pet and will give you the honest facts and advice you need without bias or prejudice. Your veterinarian is highly skilled professional who will examine and evaluate your pet’s condition, estimate your pet’s chances of recovery, and discuss potential disabilities and long-term problems.

Remember your veterinarian also cares about your pets health and welfare and will explain the medical options available and possible outcomes. However a veterinarian cannot make the euthanasia decision for you so it is important to ask all questions you may have regarding your pets condition, likelihood of recovery and what additional requirements they would have should they survive.

Most decisions do not need to be made immediately so you should ensure you have properly taken the time to consider your veterinarians advice as part of your decision making process. Remember that should your pet survive they may require a significant amount of care and medical treatment to maintain some health and quality of life. Ensure that you have the financial means and the time to fully care for your pet should they survive.

When you make your decision, you will need to discuss the dignified care of your pets remains. You can find information on the care or disposal of your pets remains from your veterinarian or Pet Funeral Director. Options available include pet burial at home, pet cremation and disposal by council contractors. The right decision in the care of your pets remains can help in the pet grieving process and will ensure your pets memory endures as a positive one.

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Informing family

Members of the family are usually aware of your pets health, which makes it easier to discuss the best option for your pet. Encourage thoughts and feelings from members of the family.

Children understand truthful answers to questions they might have about their pet. This may make the acceptance of death a little easier.

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Will there be pain?

Euthanasia has to be performed by your veterinarian. An injection of a high dose of anaesthetic is done intravenously .Your pet will immediately pass into a quiet and deep unconsciousness which is irreversible . Death is instant and painless.

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Saying goodbye

Farewelling your pet is an important stage in recovering from the grief and loss associated with a much loved pets passing. Our pets play an important role in our lives and are bound to us by a deep emotional connection. You are losing a friend and a member of your family and expressing your grief is natural and necessary.

The decisions to euthanize your pet are never an easy one. So when the time is near your family may want to say goodbye in their own way.

Your Veterinarian understands that farewells are very hard and will allow you the time you need to say your goodbyes.

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Understanding may be difficult

Others can often underestimate your love for your pet and the intensity of grief you may feel following their death. It is important to reach out to friends and family and express your emotions to them. This will help them understand and comfort you and will assist you in your recovery. It is OK to cry and talk about your pet to those who will listen.

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Coping

It can often be difficult to know what to do or how to find relief from intense feelings of separation and loneliness. You are very likely to feel low in spirits and feel the urge to separate yourself from others, remaining preoccupied with fond memories of your pet.

You should not be fearful of going “crazy” as a result of your grief, this is but a normal stage in the process and is best overcome by reaching out to others. Make sure you discuss your feelings with someone who is trained to understand and counsel for the grieving process whether that is your clergyman, a grief counsellor or your doctor.

Your veterinarian may be able to direct you to community resources on grief support and grief management. Your feelings are important and should be expressed.
Also grief brochures are available from Pets Rest In Peace and understanding is assured.

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Another pet, is it time?

The emotional gap left by a pets sudden passing can be a hard one to fill, particularly when decisions on euthanasia have been made. For some people their feelings will be that they cannot have another pet. For some a new pet can provide a new companion that will help owners in moving on.

The decision for whether to get another pet is a personal one and there is no right or wrong time for a new pet. Just remember that your next pet will be a friend for life and should not be chosen with only your feelings of grief in mind.

Make sure you discuss a new pet properly with your family to ensure everyone is ready.

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Keeping the memory!

Death is an unavoidable part of a natural life cycle yet the passing of a pet can leave a lasting impact on you and your family. Understanding of your feelings and compassion for grief can ease suffering and allow you to concentrate on your pets life, not just their death. By remembering the pleasure of the good times you spent with your pet, you will realize your pet was worthy of your grief.

Beric and Sue of Pets Rest In Peace have many years of experience in Pet Funerals and Cremation for the Toowoomba, Darling Downs, Lockyer Valley, South Burnett, and Southern Downs regions and understand the compassion and care required for the handling of your loved one. Beric and Sue understand that all pets and owners are different and offer many dignified options to help you preserve a positive and enduring memory for your pet.

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